How to install new fonts in Mac OS X operating system

Fonts are one of the ways how you can personalize and customize your documents, presentations and other content. You get some fonts with default installation of OS X and even some apps, but you can of course add more.

There exist several ways how you can to install new fonts to Mac OS X operating system and in this short article we will discuss some of them.

Installing fonts through Font Book

The first and most likely easiest way would be just to double-click on a font file (for example .otf) and Mac OS X will start an app called Font Book that will show you the font preview with Install Font option that will install and add it to your system.

Apple Mac OS X Font Book

Installing fonts by copying them to Fonts folder

The second way would be to manually copy your font files to the /Users/"UserName"/Library/Fonts/ directory. This option works only for the particular user and not whole operating system.

OS X User Library Font folder

Installing fonts to Font Library

The third way is similar that second way, but you copy the font files to /Library/Fonts/ directory instead. Fonts installed this way will be accessible by every user account present in Mac.

Supported fonts in Mac OS X

Mac OS X mainly supports OpenType fonts (.otf) and TrueType fonts (.ttf), but you can use other fonts via special font manager apps.

Related software and links:

Mac OS X icon

Mac OS X    Apple macOS / Mac OS X platform
Unix-based operating system for Apple Mac computers

 

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Related file extensions

compositefont - Composite font file

otf - OpenType font file format

pfb - Type 1 PostScript font

pfm - Printer outline metric font

ttf - TrueType font

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